Photography Styles

Every photographer is different. We each tend to take photographs of what inspires us in a style that speaks to our artistic side. I’ve developed a passion for rolling countryside landscapes, green pastures and blue sky. I also love to find those hidden gems of flowers nestled down inside tall grasses. I also like to capture images of those special moments like the love between a mother and child, the twinkle in the eye of a laughing individual, the gentleness of a newly wedding couple kissing and those moments when people let down their guard and become comfortable in front of the camera.

I’ve always had the tendency to research what other photographers are doing. I used to be very active on Deviant Art when I was building my budding talent. I shared images, read critics on other images and took 10,000 plus my first year with my DSLR. I am 100% self-taught. I didn’t work under another photographer. I didn’t attend classes. I would read and then take an hour, a day or a week to figure out just one setting until I would get the effect I was looking for.

Recently, I was doing some digging into photography styles that seemed to speak to me and I stumbled upon what’s called the Brenizer-method. It’s something unique. It built his career as a high end wedding photographer but I don’t see any reason that it can be used in many different photographic situations. If you haven’t seen his work, it can be found at Ryan Brenizer Photography. His technique is to shoot multiple images, anywhere from 7-70, and compile them into a panoramic shot. It’s not what you are thinking. Traditionally, panoramic shots are thought of as elongated, narrow views of a horizon. Not so with the Brenizer method. The technique is to build a square image. You could consider it a compiled high-definition shot that is achieved with multiple images. It’s fascinating how beautiful the photos come alive.

Here’s a video on how it’s done and how to get started.

Direct from Ryan’s web page where I found this video:

Quick tip: One important thing that got left on the cutting-room floor. When shooting any panorama ALL of your settings should be the same shot to shot — your focus, your ISO, your aperture, your shutter speed, and your white balance, otherwise it will be a hot mess. If your camera has an “AEL/AFL” button set to lock both exposure and focus, this takes care of all the variables except the white balance, and if you’re shooting RAW you can correct that later.

This is my mission for the week! I want to find some time to attempt some of these shots. Just like the video says, 4 shots is really all you need…. I’ll make sure to share the end results, both good and bad.

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One thought on “Photography Styles

  1. Pingback: Inspiration is a good thing | theshadesblog

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